In the piece of So Many Times, Instants and Moments, Romin investigates the moment’s impact on drawing as an act. Through specific parameters that form the outcomes of the drawings, different approaches to understanding time were made. For example, she tried to understand others’ perception of time through using a GPS application while following people according to prescribed rules. Later these routes were translated to drawings. The drawings, made on plexiglass, are in a constant motion, casting projected shadows on the floor. The work deals with how we today usually understand time as something linear and qualitative, separated from our actions, rather than as a flow of different moments.
 
What do we really mean when we talk about time? Is it even possible to perceive someone else’s time and is there really something that can be called time or is it only a human construction used to understand our own existence? Whether we understand time or not, we must relate to it, but time is not something that one has or does not have or something that one can obtain. The movement of time is independent of our actions; it is only our individual experiences that differ. In our society we are encouraged to efficiency and production, we are expected to manage our time well, but is it possible to manage something that we do not even know that it exists?
 
Interactive drawing installation, markers on plexiglass, hemp, light sensor and wood. Thesis art work shown at the exhibition Bad Timing at Göteborg Konsthall, Sweden, 2018.